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Iceland, Norway and US aquaculture rated high, Canada slipping, in conservation groups' report

The Atlantic Salmon Federation and the World Wildlife Fund today released a report that gauges the impact of international aquaculture policies on wild Atlantic salmon populations.

May 31, 2005

In 2003, the environmenal groups released a study "Protecting Wild Atlantic Salmon from Impacts of Salmon Aquaculture" that rated the performance of various North Atlantic Salmon Conservation Organization (NASCO) signatory nations in regulating their aquaculture industries to lessen the impact on wild Atlantic salmon.

Since then, NASCO has adopted new resolutions and agreed to review the reporting and implementation of its resolutions among signatory nations. In taking these changes into consideration, along with consultation with key NASCO signatories, the Atlantic Salmon Federation and the World Wildlife Fund have now issued a second edition of their 2003 study: Protecting Wild Atlantic Salmon from Impacts of Salmon Aquaculture: A Country-by-Country Progress Report 2nd Edition

The overall highest-scoring nations in the 2005 study were Iceland (9.6), Norway, (9) and the United States (7.1). These three nations also showed the greatest improvement in aquaculture regulation since the 2003 study: United States ( 92% increase), Iceland (76% increase), and Norway (62% increase). Only Canada’s performance has slipped since 2003 (dropping to 2.1 from 2.85, a 26% decrease)

The Atlantic Salmon Federation and the World Wildlife Fund rated the performance of Canada, The United States of America, Iceland, Norway, Scotland, and Ireland, all of which had been profiled in the 2003 study. Although previously rated, the Faroe Islands (a self-governing territory of the Danish Commonwealth) was not included in the 2005 study due to a lack of data.

The study was based on each nation’s performance on 8 criteria:

Adoption of (aquaculture facility) ‘siting’ policy aimed at keeping aquaculture at a safe distance from salmon rivers.

Degree to which cumulative environmental impacts of salmon farming on an entire bay or other ecosystem are considered in ‘siting’ decisions.

Adequacy of standards for fish husbandry, including best industry practices in regard to year-class separation, fallowing of sites and maximum stocking densities.

Adequacy of monitoring and enforcement of best practices in fish husbandry.

Adequacy of practices and procedures for early detection of an outbreak of any disease or parasitic infection likely to affect Atlantic salmon and rapid response to such an outbreak.

Adequacy of national plan for minimizing escapes in regard to equipment and structures.

Adequacy of national plan for minimizing escapes in regard to management operations, sitespecific contingency plans and notification of escapes.

Adequacy of monitoring in order to assess compliance with the national plan and to verify the plan's efficacy.

Read the report: Full Report (808kb) | Exec. Summary (505kb)

Canada Lags on International Aquaculture Eng | Fr

US Gets Improved Score on Aquaculture Policies

Ireland Gets Improved Score on Aquaculture Policies

 

Norway Gets Improved Score on Aquaculture Policies

 

Scotland Gets Improved Score on Aquaculture Policies

 

Iceland Gets Improved Score on Aquaculture Policies

 

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