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No drug residues detected in farmed Norwegian salmon for consumption

Drug usage just 2% of two decades ago

April 19, 2007

No drug residues detected in farmed Norwegian salmon for consumption

Between 1998-2006, Norway's National Institute of Nutrition and Seafood Research (NIFES) analysed over 20,000 samples from farmed salmon and to date, it says, no drug residues have been detected in any of the samples.

 “From 1998-2005, NIFES has analysed over 20,000 samples of mainly farmed salmon for drug residues and other undesirable components. So far, no drug residues have been detected in any of the samples”, says Bjørn Tore Lunestad, researcher in the Seafood Safety Programme at the National Institute of Nutrition and Seafood Research (NIFES).

“At NIFES’ laboratories, drug residues in fish are analysed by the use of 22 different analytical methods. The detection limit for current chemical methods are between 0.2 to 50.0 nanograms drug residue per gram sample, which is far below the MRLs established for the various medicinal products”, says Lunestad.

There has been a substantial reduction in the use of antibiotics for farmed fish in recent years Current use is only 2 % of the amount used in 1987. During the same period, the annual production of farmed fish has increased from less than 100,000 to over 600,000 tonnes of fish.

For more information contact Bjørn Tore Lunestad, Scientist with the Programme for Seafood Safety at NIFES: blu@nifes.no

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