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Researchers find antibiotic resistant genes in fishmeal

A team of researchers in China has found 132 antibiotic resistant genes (ARG\'s) in commercially available fishmeal. The study, published in Environmental Science and Technology, investigated high-throughput ARG profiles in representative fishmeal products and the impact of fishmeal on the sediment resistome. \"Our study has revealed for the first time that fishmeal itself is a major reservoir for ARGs, and the shift in the bacterial community induced by the nutrients in fishmeal is the main driver shaping the resistome in mariculture microcosm sediment. Our findings caution against the previously unperceived risk of ARG propagation in fishmeal-receiving ecosystems.\"

August 31, 2017

A team of researchers in China has found 132 antibiotic resistant genes (ARG\'s) in commercially available fishmeal.

The study, published in Environmental Science and Technology, investigated high-throughput ARG profiles in representative fishmeal products and the impact of fishmeal on the sediment resistome. 

\"Antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) are globally prevalent in mariculture sediment, and their presence is an issue of concern in the context of antibiotic use. Although large amounts of fishmeal have been released into the sediment, the role of fishmeal in ARG dissemination remains unclear.\"

\"A total of 132 unique ARGs and 4 mobile genetic elements (MGEs) were detected in five fishmeal products. ARG abundance and diversity in the mariculture microcosm sediment were significantly increased by the addition of fishmeal.\"

\"Our study has revealed for the first time that fishmeal itself is a major reservoir for ARGs, and the shift in the bacterial community induced by the nutrients in fishmeal is the main driver shaping the resistome in mariculture microcosm sediment. Our findings caution against the previously unperceived risk of ARG propagation in fishmeal-receiving ecosystems.\"

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