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US - Turning food byproducts into protein for fish feed

A US company has announced it is now able to rapidly produce an animal protein from food byproducts. The process is designed to locate next to food processing plants with large volumes of suitable byproducts that can be converted to protein. The protein can be used in diets for salmonoids and other salt water species, and has a higher calorie content than fishmeal.

July 5, 2018

In Raleigh, North Carolina, Integrated BioChem (IBC) announced that it is now able to rapidly produce an animal protein from food byproducts. The process is designed to locate next to food processing plants with large volumes of suitable byproducts that can be converted to protein. This would enable IBC to offer its customer’s long term fixed priced contracts for the protein produced. 

IBC’s patented process is called Managed Ecosystem Fermentation (MEF). The MEF process is the industrialisation of the first stomach of a ruminant animal where cellulose is converted by microbes into digestible protein. This protein contains multiple lipids including Omega 3, 6, and 9. The process is unique because it utilises an ecosystem of over 3,000 species of microbes. This enables the process to accept a varying feedstock material and operate at moderate temperatures.

The protein produced is a fine powder that can be easily incorporated into the formulation process of a feed mill. The protein has less than 10% moisture content. The lipid content can be varied to meet the desired concentration of protein. Then the separated lipids can be returned to provide the desired feed mix. As it is extracted from the fermentation, the protein is similar to raw fish, having a complete amino acid profile. This is an animal based protein that can be used for salmonoids and other salt water species, with a higher calorie content than fishmeal.

Source: All About Feed // Original Article 

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