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Canadian Food Inspection Agency Demands Certificate of Anlysis for Vegetable Protein Concentrate Products and Amino Acids

Certificate of Analysis for melamine and cyanuric acid required, irrespective of country of origin

June 7, 2007


Canadian Food Inspection Agency Demands Certificate of Anlysis for Vegetable Protein Concentrate Products and Amino Acids

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has announced that it now requires a certificate of analysis for melamine and cyanuric acid. While requirements were in place for Chinese products, no stipulations were placed on other countries of origin.

Now, CFIA is requiring that vegetable protein concentrate products and amino acids have a certificate of analysis from an acceptable laboratory using an acceptable method of analysis, regardless of country of origin.

The following products require certificate of analysis:

Wheat gluten
Wheat protein
Wheat protein concentrate
Rice gluten
Rice protein
Rice protein concentrate
Corn gluten
Corn proteins
Corn protein concentrate
Corn-by products
Soy protein concentrate
Soy protein isolate
Mung bean protein
Protein hydrolysates
Amino acids (and their salts - include MSG-monosodium glutamate)

Citing that the results of this monitoring program will help the Agency determine if further measures are required to prevent the entry of contaminated vegetable protein concentrates into Canada, CFIA is requiring the following methods from one of the following approved laboratories:

The acceptable methods of analysis are:

(A) Determination of Melamine using Liquid Chromatography Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS/MS) and Screening for Cyanuric Acid using Liquid Chromatography Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS/MS) (CFIA methods);

(B) GC-MS Method for Screening and Confirmation of Melamine and Related Analogs (USFDA method); and

(C) A method that is based on mass spectrometry methods, has sensitivity to10 mg per kg or less and is used by a Canadian private sector laboratory that is accredited by the Standards Council of Canada to ISO 17025.

The acceptable laboratories are:

(A) The CFIA laboratory in Calgary;

(B) Canadian private sector laboratories accredited by the Standards Council of Canada to ISO 17025 (www.scc.ca);

(C) United States Food and Drug Administration (USFDA) laboratories;

(D) USFDA Food Emergency Response Network laboratories; and

(E) United States Customs and Border Protection laboratories.

Acceptability of other laboratories will be assessed by the Science Branch of the CFIA on a case-by-case basis.

The American Feed Industry Association (AFIA)  is  in discussions with FDA and USDA urging intervention to prevent disruption of trade. Additionally, we are seeking clarity on the requirements outlined by CFIA.

If your firm has questions about current incidents or needs assistance, you may contact AFIA VP Richard Sellers email or Director of Ingredient and State Regulatory Manager, Jarrod Kersey email.

CFIA’s website.

Visit Eurofins regarding analysis of melamine.

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