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Open-access tool to assess alternative ingredients soon available

The University of Santa Cruz, USA, is developing an open-access tool that will allow users to assess information on alternative ingredients meeting the nutritional requirements of farmed fish, ensure a high-quality product with low environmental impact, and compete with the costs of conventional ingredients.

Open-access tool to assess alternative ingredients soon available

November 27, 2019

The University of Santa Cruz in California, USA, has received a $245,000 federal grant to make aquaculture more sustainable. The university’s Coastal Science and Policy Program is developing an ocean-friendly, algae-based alternative food for farmed fish, who currently consume fishmeal and fish oil.

The grant will also support their work developing a tool to compare the economic and environmental costs of alternative and conventional ingredients in aquaculture feeds. The team is developing an open-access tool that will allow users to assess information on alternative ingredients meeting the nutritional requirements of farmed fish, ensure a high-quality product with low environmental impact, and compete with the costs of conventional ingredients.

"We are working with stakeholders across the supply chain—aquafeed companies, fish farmers, consultants, investors, nonprofits, researchers, and government leaders—to help drive innovation, commercialization, adoption and acceptance of more sustainable aquafeeds," said Anne Kapuscinski, professor of environmental studies and director of the Coastal Science and Policy Program.

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