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Southern Shrimp Alliance roles out marketing campaign

The Southern Shrimp Alliance, the U.S. group behind efforts to impose tariffs on imported shrimp, has launched Wild-caught American Shrimp, a marketing campaign aimed to coincide with the deadline for required Country of Origin labeling for shrimp.

September 29, 2004

The Southern Shrimp Alliance, the U.S. group behind efforts to impose tariffs on imported shrimp, has launched Wild-caught American Shrimp, a marketing campaign aimed to coincide with the deadline for required Country of Origin labeling for shrimp.

The campaign is designed to educate consumers about the many nutritional and economic benefits of eating wild-caught American shrimp.

 "Fished directly from the open ocean, wild-caught American shrimp has a special taste," said Elaine Knight, President of Wild American Shrimp, Inc.(WASI). "Most Americans don't realize that over eighty per cent of shrimp consumed in the U.S. is imported, and much of that is farm-raised," Knight continued. "We're here to let them know they have a choice."
  
Representing the industry in eight southern states- Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Texas - Wild American shrimp will be promoted through a multi-faceted advertising and
marketing campaign as a premium product to compete with imported shrimp.    

The group said in a press release: "Consumers should ask for naturally caught Wild American shrimp at their local grocery store, seafood market and restaurants. Work is underway to identify Wild American shrimp so that it will be easy to find. In addition, country of origin labeling laws, scheduled to take effect September 30, 2004, will help consumers distinguish the origin and method of production of all seafood".

 "We want to inform American consumers so they can make educated decisions about the seafood they're eating," said Knight. "Wild American shrimp satisfies consumers' increasing desire for foods that grow naturally."
   
Board members of the Southern Shrimp Alliance, from which WASI evolved, created the corporation to build Wild American shrimp brand equity. The press release says "WASI devotes its resources to raising public awareness about the many nutritional benefits of wild-caught American shrimp. Its mission is to educate consumers about the advantages of choosing seafood that grows naturally, is caught fresh and supports the U.S. seafood industry".

WASI wants consumers to know they have a distinct choice -- Wild American shrimp -- when selecting shrimp while dining out or shopping at the supermarket. The group is creating a certification to ensure uniform quality from the boat to the consumer's table, part of an awareness campaign that also includes grocers and restaurateurs dedicated to offering an outstanding seafood choice to their customers.

"Wild American shrimp makes all the difference in a shrimp recipe, whether it's prepared at home or in a restaurant," said Paula Deen, host of the popular Food Network Show, Paula's Home Cooking, and owner of the acclaimed The Lady and Sons restaurant in Savannah, Georgia. "It's sweet and tender, and it's my favorite shrimp on the market today."

The press release says "Warm-water wild-caught American shrimp grow naturally in the wild and are fished by shrimpers who trawl the seas for fresh catches of the popular crustacean. Nurtured in nutrient-rich marshes and estuaries before migrating to the ocean, wild-caught American shrimp grow to be tender, sweet, meaty and
flavorful.     Just like wild Alaskan Salmon, Certified Angus Beef and the authentic Vidalia Onion, Wild American shrimp is the cream of the crop, "raised in God's pond," said Knight.

Editor's note:

In July 2004, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, an agency of the U.S. Department of Commerce,granted $3,670,926 to Wild American Shrimp, Inc. to help market domestic shrimp.

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